Available courses

This course explores rights and responsibilities associated with being an active citizen in a democratic society. Students will explore issues of civic importance such as healthy schools, community planning, environmental responsibility, and the influence of social media, while developing their understanding of the role of civic engagement and of political processes in the local, national, and/or global community. Students will apply the concepts of political thinking and the political inquiry process to investigate, and express informed opinions about, a range of political issues and developments that are both of significance in today’s world and of personal interest to them. 

The course has three strands. Instruction and learning related to the expectations in strand A are to be interwoven with instruction and learning related to expectations from the other two strands. Strand A must not be seen as independent of the other strands. Student achievement of the expectations in strand A is to be assessed and evaluated throughout the course. Throughout this course, when planning instruction, teachers should weave the expectations from strand A in with the expectations from strands B and C. Aspects of the citizenship education framework found on page 10 should also be considered when planning instruction.


Prerequisite: None


Course Description:

This course teaches students how to develop and achieve personal goals for future learning, work and community involvement. Students will assess their interests, skills and characteristics and investigate current economic and workplace trends, work opportunities, and ways to search for work. The course explores post-secondary learning and career options, prepares students for managing work and life transitions, and helps students focus on their goals through the development of a career plan.

Grade: 10
Course Type: Open
Credit Value: 0.5
Prerequisite: None

This course explores social, economic, and political developments and events and their impact on the lives of different groups in Canada since 1914. Students will examine the role of conflict and cooperation in Canadian society, Canada’s evolving role within the global community, and the impact of various individuals, organizations, and events on Canadian identity, citizenship, and heritage. They will develop their ability to apply the concepts of historical thinking and the historical inquiry process, including the interpretation and analysis of evidence, when investigating key issues and events in Canadian history since 1914. 

Prerequisite: None